US FEMALE PILOTS ALLOWED ASHES AT ARLINGTON

US FEMALE PILOTS ALLOWED ASHES AT ARLINGTON

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ELMENDORF AFB, Alaska -- Four F-15C pilots from the 3rd Wing step to their respective jets July 5 for the fini flight of Maj. Andrea “Gunna” Misener, 19th Figher Squadron, pictured far left. To her right are Capt. Jammie “Trix” Jamieson of the 12th Fighter Squadron, Maj. Carey “Mamba” Jones, 19th Fighter Squadron, and Capt. Samantha “Combo” Weeks, 12th Fighter Squadron. When Maj. Misener worked out who would be joining her in her four-ship fini flight, it became apparent there was a probable first in the Eagle community. Despite the growing number of females who have joined the ranks of fighter pilots since the career opened up to women in 1993, an all-female four-ship had not been accomplished in the F-15C before. “It was a great flight,” said Maj. Misener after her final flight at Elmendorf. “We killed all the bandits and protected the target area. There were no Eagle losses.” The major says she will miss her flying squadron, as she moves on to new challenges at the year-long Joint Military Intelligence College in Washington D.C. (photo by Tech. Sgt. Keith Brown)

-US FEMALE PILOTS ALLOWED ASHES AT ARLINGTON

– The 19-week long debate has finally ended with the sending of a bill that will officially recognize the WARPs to the president.

 

US FEMALE PILOTS ALLOWED ASHES AT ARLINGTON

A bill that would allow female World War II pilots known as WASPs to continue placing their ashes at Arlington National Cemetery has been sent to President Obama by the congress, ABC news reported.

The House approved the bill Wednesday hours after it cleared the Senate by voice vote. The legislation won broad support from Republicans and Democrats.

Speaking with News men, House representative and retired pilot, Martha McSally, reportedly said, “It’s been just 19 weeks since the Army’s decision to kick out our pioneering female World War II pilots was brought to light, and we’ve been fighting ever since,” said Rep, R-Ariz., one of the bill’s sponsors and a retired Air Force fighter pilot.

US FEMALE PILOTS ALLOWED ASHES AT ARLINGTON

The WASPs served in a unit called Women Air force Service Pilots. They flew noncombat missions to free up male pilots for combat.

The women who were considered civilians during the war were granted the status of veterans by the 1977 federal law reforms.

They had been eligible since 2002 to have their ashes placed at Arlington with military honours. In March 2015, the then-Secretary of the Army John McHugh ruled that WASPs never should have been allowed in and revoked their eligibility.

As reported by ABC News, the family of a WASP who died after McHugh’s ruling, Elaine Harmon, pushed to have the eligibility restored. Her ashes are sitting in a closet in her daughter Terry Harmon’s home.

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Eligibility for in-ground burial at Arlington, which has severe space limitations, is extremely tight, and not even all World War II veterans are eligible for burial there.

But eligibility for placement of ashes, or above-ground internment, is not quite as strict. Arlington’s rules state that “any former member of the Armed Forces who served on active duty (other than for training) and whose last service terminated honourably” is eligible to have their ashes placed at Arlington.

US FEMALE PILOTS ALLOWED ASHES AT ARLINGTON